Kids Eye Exams

Kids Children Eyeglasses Eyecare Patients Lancaster PA
Dr Lauver's Pediatric Exams start at age 6 months and continue annually until the age of 18. This exam begins with a calm and inviting Kids' Waiting Area. Your child can play with toys, color or play a video game while waiting to be examined.

We offer two types of eye exams for children:

  • Routine eye exams
  • Developmental eye exams


Routine Exams

Routine Exams examine the Health of the eye, including Cornea, Retina, Intraocular Lens and checks (refracts) if the patient has any need for prescription eyewear. This exam takes approximately 20 minutes.

During this exam, several tests are performed:

  • Visual Acuity
  • Color Blindness
  • Cover Test
  • Refraction
  • Slit lamp Exam
  • Glaucoma Test
  • Pupil Dilation (only if there is a family history of eye disease or diabetes).


Learn more about our tests on the exams page

Developmental Eye Exams

Developmental Eye Exams are specialized exams done when a patient continues to have symptoms even after a refractive error has been detected and/or prescription eyewear is prescribed. This exam takes approximately 1 hour, and typically results in a recommendation for Vision Therapy.

During this exam, several measurements are performed in order to determine if the Visual System is functioning properly:

  • Eye Alignment - Near and Far
  • Focusing - Near and Far
  • Eye Teaming - Eye Tracking
  • Stamina of Eye muscles
  • Brain - Eye Interaction
  • Eye Fixation
  • Flexibility of the Visual System


If is it determined that Vision Therapy is needed, Dr. Lauver will discuss the results and corrective options in detail. We offer an on-site Vision Therapy program, through Advanced Vision Therapy Center. Their therapists work directly with Dr. Lauver for the duration of therapy to ensure the best possible outcome.

Vision and Learning Disabilities

If your child exhibits any of the following behaviors, he or she may be suffering from a binocular or other visual system deficiencies, including visual perception and memory. Several studies have shown that 68% of children labeled as reading disabled actually have a measurable corrective problem in accurate aiming of both eyes at the line of print. More often than not, problems with a child's visual system contribute to learning disabilities.

Symptoms of Visual System Problems

  • Seems bright, but struggles with reading
  • Fatigues quickly when reading, with frequent signs of frustration
  • Is unable to sit still; cannot stay on task for any length of time
  • Reverses words, numbers or letters
  • Has difficulty remembering spelling words
  • Is disorganized and frustrated when studying visual information
  • Frequently loses his place, skips words or whole lines of text
  • Has poor reading comprehension
  • Has difficulty copying from the board or a book, has sloppy handwriting
  • Medication or tutoring has not been successful in improving school performance
  • Has been labeled LD (learning disabilities), ADD, ADHD, or dyslexic


Several studies have shown that 68% of children labeled as reading disabled actually have a measurable corrective problem in accurate aiming of both eyes at the line of print. More often than not, problems with a child's visual system contribute to learning disabilities.